Friday, September 27, 2013

September Flowers and Berries



September is quite an interesting month when it comes to flowers and berries.

Flower Power

There are a few flowers that have been thriving all summer and will continue to flaunt their colors into Fall.  One of my favorites of this type is physostegia (Obedient Flower).  This flower has beautiful blooms and is very easy to care for (too easy, in fact!).  It does well in moist soil, but can spread rapidly in boggy areas.  This plant gets its nick name because the stems can be bent in any direction and will stay put -- very fun to watch and it's a treat to use in a floral arrangement. Pollinators, particularly bumble bees, love them, too.  It's a win-win!  Plant some next spring.


Physostegia (Obedient Flowers)
Cedarmere Farm


Some summer flowers have very attractive seed heads at the end of the flowering cycle.  Echinacea (Cornflower) is one such flowers; the seed heads add an interesting dimension to a floral arrangement.  This is a plus for anyone who likes to make flower arrangements, because when you refresh your arrangement (see Autumn Glory - Simple Elegance Post), if the flowers no longer look perky, you can just pull the petals off, and voila! you have something different to create your new arrangement with.  My favorite is the Pow Wow Wild Berry Cornflower (see picture below).  Echinacea plants are very easy to grow and require very little care.  Pollinators love these flowers, too.  Another win-win!  Plant some of these next spring.

Echinacea purpurea (Pow Wow Wild Berry Cornflower)
Cedarmere Farm


Enchanting Berries

While adding striking colors to our landscape, some berries are also a great food source for wildlife. Two of my favorites are pyracantha (Firethorn) and callicarpa americana (American Beautyberry).  In our garden in Virginia, these berries begin displaying their colors in early September, and the colors intensify as the cold weather sets in.  The Beautyberry leaves drop off in the late Fall, leaving behind a stunning display of deep purple berries.  The Firethorn berries stay bright into winter, adding much needed color to a muted landscape.  They are also great to bring indoors for holiday decoration.  Note that Firethorn has very sharp thorns; hence the name.  Carefully snip off the thorns before you handle them.  Firethorn and Beautyberries are very easy to grow and require very little care.  Wild animals also love them; they are much needed food during the cold months.  Still another win-win! Plant some of these next spring, too.


Pyracantha (Firethorn)
Cedarmere Farm

Callicarpa americana (American Beautyberry)
Cedarmere Farm


Did you detect a pattern?
Easy Care, Colorful & Wildlife Friendly

With a little planning, gardening is so rewarding.
Have fun,  
                Christa




8 comments:

  1. Love, Love, Love the berry plants. I am going to learn a lot from your blog!

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    1. Hi Joan,
      I am glad you found the info useful. Thanks for visiting.
      Christa

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  2. The echinacea looks wonderful. Thanks for the timely 'plant in spring' reminder Christa. I'm off to find some quick smart. x

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    1. Hi Amanda,
      You are so lucky it's spring in New Zealand. Happy hunting.
      Christa

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  3. Christa... Your photo of the pyracantha brings back sweet memories of the beautiful one that grew in our front yard during my childhood. Ever the decorator.. Of mud pies and such... The pretty berries adorned many creations. Pretty photos and gardening tips.. Double the pleasure! Happy Fall!

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    Replies
    1. Hi Susan,
      You have so many wonderfully sweet memories. That is so nice.
      Christa

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  4. Thank you for visiting our blog.
    You make beautiful pictures
    Have a nice day! RW & SK

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    Replies
    1. Hello RW & SK,
      Thank you for your kind comment.
      Christa

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